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Apr 19, 2014 - Earth-size Kepler-186f

Illustration Credit: NASA Ames / SETI Institute / JPL-Caltech, Discovery: Elisa V. Quintana, et al.

Planet Kepler-186f is the first known Earth-size planet to lie within the habitable zone of a star beyond the Sun. Discovered using data from the prolific planet-hunting Kepler spacecraft, the distant world orbits its parent star, a cool, dim, M dwarf star about half the size and mass of the Sun, some 500 light-years away in the constellation Cygnus. M dwarfs are common, making up about 70 percent of the stars in our Milky Way galaxy. To be within the habitable zone, where surface temperatures allowing liquid water are possible, Kepler-186f orbits close, within 53 million kilometers (about the Mercury-Sun distance) of the M dwarf star, once every 130 days. Four other planets are known in the distant system. All four are only a little larger than Earth and in much closer orbits, also illustrated in the tantalizing artist’s vision. While the size and orbit of Kepler-186f are known, its mass and composition are not, and can’t be determined by Kepler’s transit technique. Still, models suggest that it could be rocky and have an atmosphere, making it potentially the most Earth-like exoplanet discovered so far …

NB Some images are copyrighted and to use publicly or commercially, permission must be obtained from the owner. APOD text by Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell.

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Apr 19, 2014 - Earth-size Kepler-186f

Illustration Credit: NASA Ames / SETI Institute / JPL-Caltech, Discovery: Elisa V. Quintana, et al.

Planet Kepler-186f is the first known Earth-size planet to lie within the habitable zone of a star beyond the Sun. Discovered using data from the prolific planet-hunting Kepler spacecraft, the distant world orbits its parent star, a cool, dim, M dwarf star about half the size and mass of the Sun, some 500 light-years away in the constellation Cygnus. M dwarfs are common, making up about 70 percent of the stars in our Milky Way galaxy. To be within the habitable zone, where surface temperatures allowing liquid water are possible, Kepler-186f orbits close, within 53 million kilometers (about the Mercury-Sun distance) of the M dwarf star, once every 130 days. Four other planets are known in the distant system. All four are only a little larger than Earth and in much closer orbits, also illustrated in the tantalizing artist’s vision. While the size and orbit of Kepler-186f are known, its mass and composition are not, and can’t be determined by Kepler’s transit technique. Still, models suggest that it could be rocky and have an atmosphere, making it potentially the most Earth-like exoplanet discovered so far …

NB Some images are copyrighted and to use publicly or commercially, permission must be obtained from the owner. APOD text by Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell.

This email was created & sent with APODViewer - Available on the App Store


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Apr 18, 2014 - Red Moon, Green Beam

Image Credit & Copyright: Dan Long (Apache Point Observatory) - Courtesy: Tom Murphy (UC San Diego)

This is not a scene from a sci-fi special effects movie. The green beam of light and red lunar disk are real enough, captured in the early morning hours of April 15. Of course, the reddened lunar disk is easy to explain as the image was taken during this week’s total lunar eclipse. Immersed in shadow, the eclipsed Moon reflects the dimmed reddened light of all the sunsets and sunrises filtering around the edges of planet Earth, seen in silhouette from a lunar perspective. But the green beam of light really is a laser. Shot from the 3.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory in southern New Mexico, the beam’s path is revealed as Earth’s atmosphere scatters some of the intense laser light. The laser’s target is the Apollo 15 retroreflector, left on the Moon by the astronauts in 1971. By determining the light travel time delay of the returning laser pulse, the experimental team from UC San Diego is able to measure the Earth-Moon distance to millimeter precision and provide a test of General Relativity, Einstein’s theory of gravity. Conducting the lunar laser ranging experiment during a total eclipse uses the Earth like a cosmic light switch. With direct sunlight blocked, the reflector’s performance is improved over performance when illuminated by sunlight during a normal Full Moon, an effect fondly known as The Full Moon Curse.

NB Some images are copyrighted and to use publicly or commercially, permission must be obtained from the owner. APOD text by Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell.

This email was created & sent with APODViewer - Available on the App Store






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Apr 18, 2014 - Red Moon, Green Beam

Image Credit & Copyright: Dan Long (Apache Point Observatory) - Courtesy: Tom Murphy (UC San Diego)

This is not a scene from a sci-fi special effects movie. The green beam of light and red lunar disk are real enough, captured in the early morning hours of April 15. Of course, the reddened lunar disk is easy to explain as the image was taken during this week’s total lunar eclipse. Immersed in shadow, the eclipsed Moon reflects the dimmed reddened light of all the sunsets and sunrises filtering around the edges of planet Earth, seen in silhouette from a lunar perspective. But the green beam of light really is a laser. Shot from the 3.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory in southern New Mexico, the beam’s path is revealed as Earth’s atmosphere scatters some of the intense laser light. The laser’s target is the Apollo 15 retroreflector, left on the Moon by the astronauts in 1971. By determining the light travel time delay of the returning laser pulse, the experimental team from UC San Diego is able to measure the Earth-Moon distance to millimeter precision and provide a test of General Relativity, Einstein’s theory of gravity. Conducting the lunar laser ranging experiment during a total eclipse uses the Earth like a cosmic light switch. With direct sunlight blocked, the reflector’s performance is improved over performance when illuminated by sunlight during a normal Full Moon, an effect fondly known as The Full Moon Curse.

NB Some images are copyrighted and to use publicly or commercially, permission must be obtained from the owner. APOD text by Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell.

This email was created & sent with APODViewer - Available on the App Store


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Time to stop thinking and make

9° Mostly Sunny
1005 Beach Ave, Vancouver, BC, Canada






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Time to stop thinking and make

9ยฐ Mostly Sunny
1005 Beach Ave, Vancouver, BC, Canada


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Davie St @ English Bay

Check out this Photosynth panorama created by orin. Use this link to step inside and explore:


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Trees

Check out this Photosynth panorama created by orin. Use this link to step inside and explore:


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Trees in blossom

Check out this Photosynth panorama created by orin. Use this link to step inside and explore:


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Chilco St @ Beach Ave

Check out this Photosynth panorama created by orin. Use this link to step inside and explore:


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