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Apr 22, 2014 - The El Gordo Massive Galaxy Cluster

Image Credit: NASA, ESA, J. Jee (UC Davis) et al.

It is bigger than a bread box. In fact, it is much bigger than all bread boxes put together. Galaxy cluster ACT-CL J0102-4915 is one of the largest and most massive objects known. Dubbed “El Gordo”, the seven billion light years (z = 0.87) distant galaxy cluster spans about seven million light years and holds the mass of a million billion Suns. The above image of El Gordo is a composite of a visible light image from the Hubble Space Telescope, an X-ray image from the Chandra Observatory showing the hot gas in pink, and a computer generated map showing the most probable distribution of dark matter in blue, computed from gravitational lens distortions of background galaxies. Almost all of the bright spots are galaxies. The blue dark matter distribution indicates that the cluster is in the middle stages of a collision between two large galaxy clusters. A careful inspection of the image will reveal a nearly vertical galaxy that appears unusually long. That galaxy is actually far in the background and has its image stretched by the gravitational lens action of the massive cluster.

NB Some images are copyrighted and to use publicly or commercially, permission must be obtained from the owner. APOD text by Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell.

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Apr 22, 2014 - The El Gordo Massive Galaxy Cluster

Image Credit: NASA, ESA, J. Jee (UC Davis) et al.

It is bigger than a bread box. In fact, it is much bigger than all bread boxes put together. Galaxy cluster ACT-CL J0102-4915 is one of the largest and most massive objects known. Dubbed “El Gordo”, the seven billion light years (z = 0.87) distant galaxy cluster spans about seven million light years and holds the mass of a million billion Suns. The above image of El Gordo is a composite of a visible light image from the Hubble Space Telescope, an X-ray image from the Chandra Observatory showing the hot gas in pink, and a computer generated map showing the most probable distribution of dark matter in blue, computed from gravitational lens distortions of background galaxies. Almost all of the bright spots are galaxies. The blue dark matter distribution indicates that the cluster is in the middle stages of a collision between two large galaxy clusters. A careful inspection of the image will reveal a nearly vertical galaxy that appears unusually long. That galaxy is actually far in the background and has its image stretched by the gravitational lens action of the massive cluster.

NB Some images are copyrighted and to use publicly or commercially, permission must be obtained from the owner. APOD text by Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell.

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Fwd: Your Daily Achievements - 2014-04-23 - MapMyRun

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Begin forwarded message:

> From: MapMyRun
> Date: April 23, 2014 at 2:51:17 AM PDT
> To: zacheryl@me.com
> Subject: Your Daily Achievements - 2014-04-23 - MapMyRun
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> Nice! You did some hard work yesterday.
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> NEW COURSE ACHIEVEMENTS
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> Nice Work!
> You received 1 achievements from the following workouts:
> Ran 3.50 km on 2014-04-22 - 2.17 mi
> Did A Other Gym Workout Workout on 2014-04-22 - 0.0 mi
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> 5th best Personal Record
> Seaside Bicycle Route to Beach Ave course near Vanier Park
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Apr 23, 2014 - Arp 81: 100 Million Years Later

Image Credit: Hubble Legacy Archive, ESA, NASA; Processing - Martin Pugh

From planet Earth, we see this strongly distorted pair of galaxies, cataloged as Arp 81, as they were only about 100 million years after their close encounter. The havoc wreaked by their mutual gravitational interaction during the encounter is detailed in this color composite image showing twisted streams of gas and dust, a chaos of massive star formation, and a tidal tail stretching for 200 thousand light-years or so as it sweeps behind the cosmic wreckage. Also known as NGC 6622 (left) and NGC 6621, the galaxies are roughly equal in size but are destined to merge into one large galaxy in the distant future, making repeated approaches until they finally coalesce. Located in the constellation Draco, the galaxies are 280 million light-years away. Even more distant background galaxies can be spotted in this sharp, reprocessed, image from Hubble Legacy Archive data.

NB Some images are copyrighted and to use publicly or commercially, permission must be obtained from the owner. APOD text by Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell.

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Apr 23, 2014 - Arp 81: 100 Million Years Later

Image Credit: Hubble Legacy Archive, ESA, NASA; Processing - Martin Pugh

From planet Earth, we see this strongly distorted pair of galaxies, cataloged as Arp 81, as they were only about 100 million years after their close encounter. The havoc wreaked by their mutual gravitational interaction during the encounter is detailed in this color composite image showing twisted streams of gas and dust, a chaos of massive star formation, and a tidal tail stretching for 200 thousand light-years or so as it sweeps behind the cosmic wreckage. Also known as NGC 6622 (left) and NGC 6621, the galaxies are roughly equal in size but are destined to merge into one large galaxy in the distant future, making repeated approaches until they finally coalesce. Located in the constellation Draco, the galaxies are 280 million light-years away. Even more distant background galaxies can be spotted in this sharp, reprocessed, image from Hubble Legacy Archive data.

NB Some images are copyrighted and to use publicly or commercially, permission must be obtained from the owner. APOD text by Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell.

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Davie St @ English Bay

Check out this Photosynth panorama created by orin. Use this link to step inside and explore:


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Apr 21, 2014 - Massive Nearby Spiral Galaxy NGC 2841

Image Credit: Hubble, Subaru; Composition & Copyright: Robert Gendler

It is one of the more massive galaxies known. A mere 46 million light-years distant, spiral galaxy NGC 2841 can be found in the northern constellation of Ursa Major. This sharp view of the gorgeous island universe shows off a striking yellow nucleus and galactic disk. Dust lanes, small, pink star-forming regions, and young blue star clusters are embedded in the patchy, tightly wound spiral arms. In contrast, many other spirals exhibit grand, sweeping arms with large star-forming regions. NGC 2841 has a diameter of over 150,000 light-years, even larger than our own Milky Way and captured by this composite image merging exposures from the orbiting 2.4-meter Hubble Space Telescope and the ground-based 8.2-meter Subaru Telescope. X-ray images suggest that resulting winds and stellar explosions create plumes of hot gas extending into a halo around NGC 2841.

NB Some images are copyrighted and to use publicly or commercially, permission must be obtained from the owner. APOD text by Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell.

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Apr 21, 2014 - Massive Nearby Spiral Galaxy NGC 2841

Image Credit: Hubble, Subaru; Composition & Copyright: Robert Gendler

It is one of the more massive galaxies known. A mere 46 million light-years distant, spiral galaxy NGC 2841 can be found in the northern constellation of Ursa Major. This sharp view of the gorgeous island universe shows off a striking yellow nucleus and galactic disk. Dust lanes, small, pink star-forming regions, and young blue star clusters are embedded in the patchy, tightly wound spiral arms. In contrast, many other spirals exhibit grand, sweeping arms with large star-forming regions. NGC 2841 has a diameter of over 150,000 light-years, even larger than our own Milky Way and captured by this composite image merging exposures from the orbiting 2.4-meter Hubble Space Telescope and the ground-based 8.2-meter Subaru Telescope. X-ray images suggest that resulting winds and stellar explosions create plumes of hot gas extending into a halo around NGC 2841.

NB Some images are copyrighted and to use publicly or commercially, permission must be obtained from the owner. APOD text by Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell.

This email was created & sent with APODViewer - Available on the App Store


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